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New Techniques for Coral Restoration Seminar

Ellen%20Muller%20spawning%20Dlab%20smallSECORE International hosted a workshop at the Carmabi Marine Research Station Curaçao from May 18th – 27th. The opening day of the workshop started with a seminar to provide a global picture of coral restoration, discussing current obstacles and potential solutions. View the recordings of the presentations below.

Spawning Diploria labyrinthiformis with butterfly fish feeding on spawn. Photo © Ellen Muller

Presentations:

This online seminar and workshop is part of the Global Coral Restoration Project initiated by SECORE International, California Academy of Sciences and The Nature Conservancy, and further supported by CARMABI Foundation, Curaçao Sea Aquarium, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Shedd Aquarium as well as State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources.

The workshop aims to foster exchange between participants and organizers, working in the fields of coral science, restoration, aquaculture and marine resource management. The workshop is comprised of hands-on work, such as rearing coral larvae from daylight spawner Diploria labyrinthiformis, practicing the art of micro-fragmentation and outplanting techniques, as well as theoretical sessions on how to select outplanting sites and monitor restoration efforts.

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Integrating Ecosystem Services into Coral Reef Policy and Management – Hawai’i, 2017

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The Reef Resilience Network partnered with Blue Solutions to host a five-day training on Integrating Ecosystem Services into Coral Reef Policy and Management on March 6-10, 2017. Experts and participants from 12 different agencies gathered in Kona, Hawaii to gain experience in evaluating ecosystem services and how to effectively communicate the benefits they provide to people to guide decision making and inform management within their jurisdiction. The workshop included a field trip to the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai and Kiholo Bay, where participants applied their new skills to identify the ecosystem services each place provides. Over the week, participants became familiar with different tools and resources for assessing and valuing ecosystem services and learned how to navigate and create maps with Mapping Ocean Wealth. Next steps for the participants include sharing key concepts and messages about ecosystem services within their jurisdiction and incorporating learned skills into their work, projects and plans. To see photo highlights from this training view here.
Check out this video from NOAA’s Office of Coastal Management, to better understand ecosystem services and learn about various tools to use when evaluating the benefits and values. Watch here.
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Communications and Facilitation Workshop to Support Bahamas’ MPAs – Bahamas, 2016

Bahamas workshop The Reef Resilience Network provided strategic communication support for a three-year project in the Bahamas to improve management of existing marine protected areas (MPAs) and expand MPAs to restore local fisheries. At the request of key project partners, Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation, The Nature Conservancy Bahamas, and the Bahamas National Trust, Reef Resilience staff led a one-hour strategic communication webinar followed by a two-day training six months later. The trainings built participants’ strategic communication and facilitation skills, and helped them refine key messages to conduct targeted and coordinated outreach across the Bahamas archipelago. Thirty-five Bahamian outreach specialists participated in the online and in-person workshops. Facilitation training was provided by NOAA.

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Synergistic Impacts of Global Warming on the Resilience of Coral Reefs

There have been few investigations on the effects of climate change on coral reef resilience. This study focuses on how a single climate driver, sea surface temperature (SST), can both chronically (growth rate) and acutely (bleaching) affect coral reefs. A spatially explicit model was used to simulate the effects of both chronic and acute thermal stress when acting together and separately. As expected, when thermal stress does not affect reefs, coral cover increases over time. Acute thermal disturbances were found to considerably reduce coral cover and reduce reef resilience. Chronic thermal disturbances lowered resilience, but at a much smaller magnitude than those that were acute. When acting together, acute and chronic stressors act in synergism to reduce resilience. In moving forward in a changing climate, the authors argue that it is imperative to consider synergism among stressors when thinking about the future impact of climate change on reef resilience. Additionally, since reef state, or percent coral cover, and reef resilience are largely unrelated, management efforts should not be solely focused on coral cover as resilience episodes may go unnoticed. It is reef resilience that will ultimately help to identify and hopefully repair ecosystem dysfunction before any stress or damage inflicted becomes permanent.

Author: Bozec, Y-M. and P.J. Mumby
Year: 2015
View Full Article

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 370: 20130267

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Strategic Communications – Florida, 2015

A four-day learning exchange was held in partnership with the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute and NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program to help marine conservation professionals approach their outreach and communications work strategically. Participants learned key components of strategic communications, and applied these concepts to create their own communications plan. Facilitators worked with participants prior to the event to identify a marine communication project to develop during the learning exchange. Based on participants’ needs, training was also provided in media relations, interviews, and social marketing, with opportunities for practical application of these skills. Read the report.
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Community-Based Management – Hawai‘i, 2015

Four participants from The Bahamas National Trust and the Abaco Fly Fishing Guides Association visited Hawai‘i to learn about community-based management initiatives across the state, with emphasis on the State of Hawai‘i’s Makai Watch Program – an innovative program engaging communities in the management of their nearshore marine resources by building voluntary compliance through outreach and the reporting of violations to state authorities. Participants took part in a series of meetings with the coordinators and volunteers for the Makai Watch program, as well as with other programs in support of marine conservation in Hawai‘i implemented in collaboration with the Hawai‘i Department of Land and Natural Resources, with NGOs, and community-based organizations. The learning exchange was hosted in partnership with the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute and NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and was organized in conjunction with the Pacific Islands Marine Protected Areas Community. Read the report.
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Managing for Resilience – Guadeloupe, 2011

Part of the 4th International Tropical Marine Ecosystems Management Symposium (ITMEMS), this learning exchange included 58 individuals. The Reef Resilience Network participated as conference leaders and dedicated a day of the conference to resilience concepts, with trainings.

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