Tag Archives: Fisheries Management

New Network Resources: Spotlight on the Western Indian Ocean

Cleaning a coral nursery. © Reef Rescuers

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Improving Management of Spawning Aggregation Fisheries in the Seychelles Using Acoustic Telemetry

Marine managers in the Seychelles are collecting and using behavioral information on Shoemaker spinefoots to develop management strategies that protect spawning aggregations of these commercially important fish. Read the case study.

Reef Rescuers: Coral Gardening as an MPA Management Tool

To repair coral bleaching damage in a marine reserve in the Seychelles, a large scale reef restoration project uses “coral gardening”, a technique that involves collecting small pieces of healthy coral, growing them in underwater nurseries, and then transplanting them to degraded sites. Read the case studyWatch the webinar.

Preparing for Coral Bleaching in the Western Indian Ocean

David Obura of CORDIO East Africa presents updated guidance (in four basic steps!) for monitoring bleaching events in the Western Indian Ocean at basic, intermediate, and expert levels. Watch the webinar.

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Managing fisheries for reef resilience: Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries Management Area

Herbivore protection and strong community support: will this be enough to increase fish biomass, decrease algal blooms, and enhance reef resilience?

Significant increases of invasive algae are seen as a major threat to West Maui’s coral reefs. At Kāʻanapali, red algal blooms had become much more abundant, likely as a result of elevated nutrients from wastewater and fertilizers. Despite the sources of land-based pollution, the increasing abundance of algae was exacerbated by the fact that there was a decrease in abundance of reef grazing herbivores. The State of Hawai‘i designated the Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries Management Area in order to control the overabundance of marine algae on coral reefs and restore the marine ecosystem back to a healthy balance. Public awareness has increased, but we’re still waiting to see if the management plan restores health to the reef. Read more in the Kahekili case study.

 

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