Archives

Year in Review – 2017

Reflecting on the past year, there has never been a more critical time for effective coral reef management. In June of 2017, the world’s longest and most widespread bleaching event on record ended, with many reefs experiencing significant mortality. To address these – and other – challenges, the Reef Resilience Network continues to empower a global network of marine managers and scientists to improve coral reef management by sharing and implementing cutting-edge resilience science, inspiring greater collaboration, and working with global and regional reef initiatives to roll out guidance and best practices. Based on feedback from our managers, we have led in-person and online trainings, and have added new webinars, case studies, journal summaries, guidebooks, and modules on key topics to our website, reefresilience.org, which had over 150,000 visitors this year alone!

We are inspired by the thousands of reef managers, practitioners, and scientists in our Network and beyond, who spend their days working to reduce the threats facing reefs and supporting the necessary policies and programs to help our reefs to recover and thrive. We thank you and look forward and ahead to 2018 – the International Year of the Reef – and are grateful for the renewed attention to one of our world’s most precious resources, our coral reefs. See how we, as a Network, have improved reef management around the world.

RR Year in Review 2017_final

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Assisted Evolution: A Novel Tool to Overcome the Conservation Crisis?

Assisted Evolution Announcement PhotoThis symposium was live streamed as part of the Coral Restoration Consortium webinar series in conjunction with The Geomar Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and “The Future Ocean” cluster in Kiel. Speakers shared information on new approaches for the conservation of coral reefs such as assisted colonization and assisted evolution and synthetic biology. View the presentation recordings below.

Presentations:

Welcome and introduction – Marlene Wall, Geomar, Germany

Session 1: Shifting paradigms in conservation: social, public and scientific landscape of conservation genetics
Objective: The aim of session 1 is to (i) discuss new approaches for the conservation of natural environments, such as assisted colonization, assisted evolution and synthetic biology and (ii) introduce the current legal, public and scientific framework of novel methods in conservation.

Session 2: Assisted evolution in corals: Opportunities, applications, challenges, and limitations
Objective: The aim is to introduce how assisted evolution might change our way of restoring natural marine environments. What new tools are available that can improve the selection of environmental stress resistance and be implemented in conservation? What are the promises and perils of such approaches?

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

The Social Life of Okinawan Corals

In Japan, degradation of the nation’s southwestern coral reefs has been identified as a pressing environmental problem, and corals have been transformed into valuable commodities for conservation. This research analyzes the emergence of “restoration corals”—corals produced for ecological restoration—in Okinawa. Individuals briefly own these corals before they relinquish them to the coral reef, and the corals resume their lives as indistinguishable pieces of the sea. Following Kopytoff (1986), I examine the production, exchange, consumption, and de-commodification of this conservation commodity. I find that the social life of coralline commodities is not unilinear, nor is its outcome certain. As they plant their coral fragments, purchasers link them to existing religious and cultural practices and recreate corals as sites for altruism, memorialization, and divine communication. Restoration corals, in the hands of local amateur ecologists, become a way to simultaneously democratize knowledge of the sea and contest prevalent techno-scientific conservation approaches.

Author: Claus, A.C.
Year: 2017
View Abstract
Email for the full article: resilience@tnc.org

Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture 11(2): 157-174. doi:10.1558/jsrnc.18804

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

Leading coral science and conservation organizations joining forces to accelerate vital reef restoration work

Photo © Coral Restoration Foundation

Photo © Coral Restoration Foundation

We are pleased to announce the formation of a new Coral Restoration Consortium (CRC). The CRC is a community of practice that comprises scientists, managers, coral restoration practitioners, and educators dedicated to enabling coral reef ecosystems to adapt and survive the 21st century and beyond. The CRC’s mission is to foster collaboration and technology transfer among participants, and to facilitate scientific and practical ingenuity to demonstrate that restoration can achieve meaningful results at scales relevant to reefs in their roles of protecting coastlines, supporting fisheries, and serving as economic engines for coastal communities.

The Reef Resilience Network will be working in partnership with experts from the Coral Restoration Consortium to develop expanded resources for managers on restoration. New online content will be available in October 2017 and will cover the following topics prioritized by a survey of coral reef managers globally:

  • Key considerations to be made before starting a restoration program
  • Methods for propagating branching corals and massive corals
  • Using artificial structures in restoration
  • Promoting ecological processes that enhance coral populations
  • Guidance for enhancing and sustaining your restoration program

To get involved with the CRC:

  • Learn more about the Coral Restoration Consortium
  • CLICK HERE to receive e-mail updates on the CRC’s development, newsletters with scholarly information on restoration, quarterly webinar announcements, and information on how to join Working Groups
  • Watch restoration webinars

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

New Techniques for Coral Restoration in the Caribbean

Watch on YouTube

May 18, 2017

Hear experts from the Global Coral Restoration Project provide an overview of coral restoration efforts around the world and discuss current obstacles and potential solutions. This seminar kicks off an in-person workshop designed to foster exchange between practitioners working in the fields of coral science, restoration, aquaculture and marine resource management. Explore the seminar presentations and learn about coral restoration from the experts!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone

New Techniques for Coral Restoration Seminar

Ellen%20Muller%20spawning%20Dlab%20smallSECORE International hosted a workshop at the Carmabi Marine Research Station Curaçao from May 18th – 27th. The opening day of the workshop started with a seminar to provide a global picture of coral restoration, discussing current obstacles and potential solutions. View the recordings of the presentations below.

Spawning Diploria labyrinthiformis with butterfly fish feeding on spawn. Photo © Ellen Muller

Presentations:

This online seminar and workshop is part of the Global Coral Restoration Project initiated by SECORE International, California Academy of Sciences and The Nature Conservancy, and further supported by CARMABI Foundation, Curaçao Sea Aquarium, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Shedd Aquarium as well as State of Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources.

The workshop aims to foster exchange between participants and organizers, working in the fields of coral science, restoration, aquaculture and marine resource management. The workshop is comprised of hands-on work, such as rearing coral larvae from daylight spawner Diploria labyrinthiformis, practicing the art of micro-fragmentation and outplanting techniques, as well as theoretical sessions on how to select outplanting sites and monitor restoration efforts.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone